Are Eggs As Bad As Some Folks Say?

a bowl of brown eggs in a wooden bowl on a brown woven placemat
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

For years now some people would like us to believe that eggs are bad for our health. Now they want us to believe they are expensive. I believe these are half-truths. Let’s take a look at each,

Healthy or Unhealthy?

According to EBMD.com:

  1. Eggs contain 6 grams of protein and 9 “essential” amino acids (the building blocks of protein) making eggs are a complete package of protein.
  2. Eggs have more nutrients per calorie than any other food.
  3. Eggs increase HDL or “good” cholesterol when eggs are a regular staple in a person’s diet.
  4. Eggs have been shown to reduce triglycerides, especially when enriched with fatty acids (omega-3s).
  5. Increasing HDL and lowering triglycerides could also reduce the risk of a stroke.
  6. Eggs are satisfying and you feel full longer.
  7. It is easy to control portion when eating an egg. At 70 calories per egg, you know exactly what you are getting.
  8. Eggs are a better source of the antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin than spinach or kale. Antioxidants are important to eye health.
  9. Eggs have Vitamin D and Choline making them good for your brain, nerve cells and brain development.
  10. They are affordable.

Are They Affordable?

There has been a lot of talk about inflation and the cost of groceries, which has skyrocketed. While it has affected everything we eat it seems nothing is more obvious than eggs. Not so many months ago I would pick up a dozen eggs for $1.50; last week I paid $5.35 for a dozen. I started looking at options:

  • Raising Chickens? Oh, heck NO!
  • Breakfast? Sure. lots of options there. Most of which are currently in my diet rotation anyway.
  • Baking? Plain Greek yogurt can be a substitute for eggs. 1/2 cup equals 1 egg

I gave the substitute a try on a boxed muffin package in the pantry. The box called for mixing the contents with 2 eggs, oil, and water. I substituted 1 cup of Greek vanilla flavored yogurt for the eggs. Not a bad result, a bit gooier than they would have been with eggs, but good. Was I really saving money though?

Cost Comparison

If 12 eggs cost $5.40, what is the cost of 1 egg?” A simple calculation tells us”:

$5.40 divided by 12 = 45 cents

The yogurt was a large container that I had paid around $5 for. The cup of yogurt was about one-third of the container, making the cost of the yogurt $1.66. So, I spent an extra $.32 to save 2 eggs.

What’s Next?

I won’t deny that eggs have gotten expensive, comparatively; a 350% increase in the cost of anything is hard. Each one of us must decide for ourselves when and where to cut costs. This helped me. If you have found it informative, I am happy. Leave me your comments and let me know.